The Storage Effect

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What it means to be green in the storage industry

Newsweek green rankings smallSeagate was recognized as the greenest storage device manufacturer by Newsweek in their 2009 Green Rankings of Fortune 500 companies.  Seagate was ranked 182 positions higher than its nearest competitor on the list.

Just as significantly, Seagate is a strategic supplier to the #1, #2 and #4 ranked technology companies – HP, Dell and IBM.  Seagate’s focus on sustainability contributes directly to its customers’ ability to be green.

Why would Seagate be rated so much higher than its competitors?  I can’t speak for Newsweek, but here are some things to consider:

Seagate drives are more efficient. Seagate’s low-power Barracuda LP was recently tested by Maximum PC and shown to use less power and run 20% faster than similar low-power drives from other manufacturers.  Sometimes it pays to look beyond a product’s “green” label to its actual performance.

Seagate leads the industry in environmental transparency.  Most storage device manufacturers are aware of the exact make-up of <1% of materials in their products. Why? Because those are the toxic materials that their customers hold them accountable for.  Seagate tracks 96% of the materials in their hard drives from all of their suppliers, with a goal to track 100%.  This documented understanding allows Seagate to respond quickly and with credible data as their customers choose to monitor or restrict new materials.

It takes more than a product name to be truly “green”.

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