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Awesome! Intel Ultrabooks…but where do they fit and how do we?

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“Intel aims to shift 40 percent of consumer laptops to its “Ultrabook” model, a new category of thin and light mobile computers.”  - Intel executive vice president Sean Maloney at Computex 2011 revealing Ultrabook, which is basically a “hybrid laptop”.

It’s not doubt that Intel feels the pressure in adoption of their Atom processor as they face fierce competition from Arm processors which are found in tablets from Apple, Motorola, RIM and Samsung. Tom’s Hardware posted on the very subject back in January. Intel, being the market maker they are, is relying on their platform expertise to drive a new mobile category…the Ultrabook, and OEMs like Asus are already on board with its UX21 as well as Acer.

Apparently one path to attack the tablet space is to create an entirely new platform.  Never before have so many options been available to consumers in terms of mobile computing devices.  Everything from smartphones to tablets, netbooks to notebooks to ultra-thin notebooks, and now ultrabooks.

But where do they fit?

Only time will tell, but considering Intel’s vision to move nearly half of the consumer laptop market (40%) in this direction, I would say smack dab in the middle. Where else would you aim to drive that much of an existing market?  This made me think of how hard drive companies like Seagate are positioned product-wise for both internal and external hard drives given this bold endeavor by Intel.

Pretty well it looks like…

Are you going to get an Ultrabook?

 

 

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