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CES 2012: Ultrabooks, Tablets, and Storage?

Last year, something like 35 tablets were introduced at CES, and a host of others over the course of 2011 e.g. Amazon’s Kindle Fire. This year, the tablet craze seems to have been overshadowed by the Intel led Ultrabook craze.

Treading up and down the aisles of CES, there was no shortage of Ultrabooks and Tablets. Intel’s booth alone had dozens on display, and according to Intel via Cnet, 15 Ultrabooks exist today with 75 in the design phase. Of course, by pure definition, Ultrabooks and Tablets are based on anywhere between 64GB and 256GB of SSD or flash storage (with the exception of Archos on the tablet side, and Acer on the Ultrabook side which both include an option for a Seagate Momentus Thin 250GB or 320GB hard drive).

For those craving ultra-thin, what better companion than an ultra-thin external hard drive like the one revealed at last year’s CES show by Seagate.  For those Ultrabooks and Tablet users that want to work and play in a wireless world, when it comes to additional storage for your movies, photos, music, whatever, you have a few options:

  • A Personal Cloud in your home
  • A Personal Cloud in the cloud (e.g. Amazon)
  • A Mobile / Pocket Cloud (e.g. GoFlex Satellite)

No doubt, the Ultrabook and Tablet craze will not be short-lived. We’re in it for the long haul and just because they predominantly use consumer grade flash storage, that does not mean they won’t ultimately need hard drive storage…and lots of it.

By the way, I’m sold on the Ultrabook…now which one to pick? Do you have a favorite?

More from CES.

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